Discuss the portrayal of religion in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl and Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Please respond to the following questions with 200 words or more using the attached documents.
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  1. Discuss the portrayal of religion in Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl and Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
  2. Discuss one or more authors who show examples of following Stowe’s works.
  3. Compare/contrast the responses of two or more mothers from Uncle Tom’s Cabin to their children being taken away.
  4. Analyze the slaves’ owners’ “nicknames” in Douglass’s Narrative in relation to how those names show through their actions.
  5. How do the family challenges in Uncle Tom’s Cabin and Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl seem similar?
  6. Compare and contrast in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, and Wells Brown.
  7. Compare Stowe, Douglass, and Wells Brown to each other. Explain what they wanted to come from their writings.
  8. Compare and contrast the use of family to attract an audience in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, and Clotel.
  9. Compare and contrast the way women and men were treated in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, and Douglass’s Narrative.
  10. Compare and contrast the ways slaves fought for freedom in the writings of Douglass, Wells Brown, and Melville.
  11. What was the role of religion in condemning or justifying slavery in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Lincoln, and Wells Brown?
  12. According to William Wells Brown, Stowe, and Jacobs, who (women, men, or children) had the worst in slavery and why?
  13. Wells Brown, Douglass, and Jacobs all had similar beliefs in how Christianity affected slavery. What were their beliefs?
  14. Describe four different reactions of mothers whose children were taken from them in Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
  15. Who was the main audience for Stowe, Jacobs, and Brown, and why were they their target audience?
  16. Describe how similar laws (Fugitive Slave Law and laws regarding slaves and marriage) were broken in Stowe, Jacobs, and Wells Brown’s novels.

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