It’s easy to ask “how did this happen?”

The Civil War was the most devastating war in American history, and its effects are still felt today. It’s easy to ask “how did this happen?” but the story is more complex than you might think.

historian James McPherson argues that there was no one specific event or event that led to the Civil War; instead, it was a series of events over time that led to irreconcilable differences between North and South over issues like slavery and states’ rights.

He also points out that while many people believe slavery was the reason for the war, it wasn’t necessarily—it’s just what drew attention to these other issues. The South wanted to keep slavery around because they saw it as a source of cheap labor, while Northerners were not comfortable with having slaves living among them or owning slaves themselves.

But even if slavery wasn’t necessarily the reason for the war, it certainly played a role—the North wanted to abolish slavery but didn’t want to upset their Southern allies by doing so; meanwhile, slave owners in the South saw abolition as a threat to their livelihood and way of life.

The Civil War was indeed inevitable

The roots of the conflict lay in the issue of slavery, which had existed in America since its early days and was a divisive issue between North and South. The Southern states wanted to keep slavery legal and wanted to expand it into new territories, while the Northern states were against slavery and wanted it abolished.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected president in 1860 on an anti-slavery platform, he made it clear that he would not allow slavery to expand into new territories. This angered many Southerners who believed that their right to own slaves was guaranteed by the U.S Constitution. When southern states began withdrawing from the union, Lincoln refused to allow them to secede peacefully and instead sent troops to prevent them from doing so.

Slavery in the south was what started the Civil War

The North wanted slavery to be banned, because they thought that it was wrong to have slaves. They also wanted to make sure that everyone had equal rights and opportunities.

The South wanted slavery to stay legal, because they believed that it was their right as citizens of the United States of America. They also believed that slaves were property, and therefore could not be held against their will by anyone.

The Civil War was not only inevitable but also necessary

The causes of the Civil War are many, and they are complex. But the underlying cause is an issue that has plagued the United States since its founding: slavery.

Slavery was a major source of tension in America from its very beginning, as many of the original settlers came to America fleeing religious persecution or seeking economic opportunity—and they brought slaves with them. Slavery was legal at that time, and so it continued to be legal as more people moved into America and brought their slaves with them. Slaves were treated as property rather than as human beings, and their owners had complete control over their lives. This is why slaves could be beaten for misbehavior or sold away from their families without any recourse for them or their families. As slavery spread across America, it became increasingly profitable for slave owners to buy more slaves; there was no cost to owning them (food and shelter), so there was no limit on how much money could be made from owning them—which led to some people owning hundreds or thousands of slaves at once!

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